reorient-vol-2-no-1-autumn-2016

ReOrient: Vol. 2, No. 1, Autumn 2016

Copyright 2016 Pluto Journals

Front Matter

PREVIEW

ReOrient
Vol. 2, No. 1 (Autumn 2016)
DOI: 10.13169/reorient.2.1.fm
Page Count: 4
Copyright 2016 Pluto Journals

Introduction: Tolerance in Modern Islamic Thought by Humeira Iqtidar

Download ($20.00):  www.jstor.org

ReOrient
Vol. 2, No. 1 (Autumn 2016), pp. 5-11
Published by: Pluto Journals
DOI: 10.13169/reorient.2.1.0005
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.13169/reorient.2.1.0005
Page Count: 7
Copyright 2016 Pluto Journals

 Journal Article 1

Relational Difference and the Grounds of Comparison: Abdallah Laroui’s Critique of Centrism

By Nils Riecken
ReOrient
Vol. 2, No. 1 (Autumn 2016), pp. 12-30
Published by: Pluto Journals
DOI: 110.13169/reorient.2.1.0012
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.13169/reorient.2.1.0012
Page Count: 19

PREVIEW

Abstract

This article examines how the Moroccan historian and intellectual Abdallah Laroui (born in 1933) develops a critique of centrist modes of representing difference. I argue that Laroui himself is situated within hegemonic, hierarchical, and centrist practices of comparison that treat the difference between “Europe” on one hand and “Islam” and “Arab culture” on the other as foundational. Despite being situated in this context, the article argues that Laroui’s practice of comparison can be read differently and may open the possibility of the unsettling of such centrist practices. Whereas centrist practices of comparison fixate the relationship between universal and the particular, Laroui points out that any comparative observation stages a historically situated account of the relationship between the particular and the universal. In this way, he reveals that the grounds of comparison are never as flat and homogeneous as centrist practices of comparison imply, and draws attention to the historical-epistemological and political conditions under which difference is relationally produced. Through studying Laroui’s discussion of the logic of the concept of history and the concept of modernization in contemporary debates among Arab intellectuals, I analyze the conceptual form of Laroui’s version of historicism (Arabic tārīkhāniyya, French historicisme) as a particular form of historicist Marxism. This historicist method challenges what I call centrist architectures of difference produced by centrist modes of representation. It leads Laroui to develop a critical method that I characterize as a situated universalism, steering between relativism and abstract universalism.
Copyright 2016 Pluto Journals

Journal Article 2

Dhimmi Citizens: Non-Muslims in the New Islamist Discourse

By Ovamir Anjum
ReOrient
Vol. 2, No. 1 (Autumn 2016), pp. 31-50
Published by: Pluto Journals
DOI: 10.13169/reorient.2.1.0031
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.13169/reorient.2.1.0031
Page Count: 20

PREVIEW

Abstract

Accounts of modern Islamic reformist currents offered by recent studies take for granted that Islamists have embraced the modern nation-state, and, relatedly, that there is consequently a rupture in Islamic discursive tradition. This article seeks to nuance these notions by examining “the new Islamist” discourse on the poignant question of non-Muslim belonging in an Islamic state. Not all Islamists have embraced the nation-state and its majoritarian and secular logics in quite the same way. Those who remain committed to making ijtihad from within the Islamic tradition, such as Yusuf al-Qaradawi, continue to offer a fundamentally different view of political authority than those republican Islamists, such as Fahmi Huwaydi and Tariq al-Bishri, who treat Islamic tradition as a mine of wisdom and source of republican values and inspiration rather than a coherent system of norm production. This difference can be detected even when they appear to substantially agree on a number of policies and aspirations, such as the accommodation of non-Muslims as not only tolerated but as nearly equal citizens in an Islamic state.

Copyright 2016 Pluto Journal

Journal Article 3

“Is There Toleration in Islam?” Reframing a Post-Islamist Question in a Post-Secular Context

By Mohammad Mahdi Mojahedi
ReOrient
Vol. 2, No. 1 (Autumn 2016), pp. 51-72
Published by: Pluto Journals
DOI: 10.13169/reorient.2.1.0051
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.13169/reorient.2.1.0051
Page Count: 22

PREVIEW

Abstract

This article presents a critical appraisal of the post-Islamist position in the discourse on toleration in Islam. It starts with a critical overview of post-Islamism and its position on pluralism and toleration. Contextualising the post-Islamist discourse on toleration in the broader context of post-secular critique of modernity and theoretical debates on pluralist toleration, as opposed to monist (or hegemonic) toleration, post-Islamism will be criticised here for its missing the pluralist point of toleration, consequently confusing it with monist and hegemonic toleration, as well as its extreme submission to culturalism in understanding the dynamics of political transformation, and its unconditional confidence in “the secularization thesis” or “the secularization theory.”

Copyright 2016 Pluto Journal

Journal Article 4

Perpetrators’ Humanity: War, Violence, and Memory After 1971

By Yasmin Saikia
ReOrient
Vol. 2, No. 1 (Autumn 2016), pp. 73-90
Published by: Pluto Journals
DOI: 10.13169/reorient.2.1.0073
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.13169/reorient.2.1.0073
Page Count: 18

PREVIEW

Abstract

How does love for home/nation become the site for intolerance and provoke violence against others? What precipitates the expression of this hate? Is shared humanity possible among erstwhile perpetrators and victims? Through the method of oral history, in this article I probe these questions by investigating the memories of perpetrators of the 1971 war of Bangladesh. A common and shared memory of perpetrators was the humbling experience of fighting a destructive war in which they lost nation as well as their human self. The mournful memories of human loss are explained as the destruction of insāniyat, which opens the space for acknowledging the divergent desires of nationalism that clashed with human ethics. Today, the nations of India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh refuse to acknowledge the disastrous memories of 1971 because it unsettles state written histories. For perpetrators, however, the memories of violence are critical for understanding the meaning of sacrifice on behalf of nation, as well raising for them the question of ethical responsibility to victims. The moral dilemma is an “imprisoned” memory of the loss of insāniyat that cannot be articulated publicly because there is no place for it in Bangladesh and Pakistan. The fragmentary shards of perpetrators’ memories express hope for renewing the commitment to insāniyat. This is a challenge and struggle in South Asia that is divided by mythical national histories and the politics of postcolonial nationalism. Without the rethinking of insāniyat at a public level, I’d argue the question of tolerance would remain submerged or become simply a document constructed at supra-national level without anchoring it within culture and society in South Asia.

Copyright 2016 Pluto Journal

 Book Review 1

Review: This Muslim American Life: Dispatches from the War on Terror by Moustafa Bayoumi

Reviewed Work: This Muslim American Life: Dispatches from the War on Terror by Moustafa Bayoumi
Review by: Maha Hilal
ReOrient
Vol. 2, No. 1 (Autumn 2016), pp. 91-94
Published by: Pluto Journals
DOI: 10.13169/reorient.2.1.0091
Stable URL:http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.13169/reorient.2.1.0091
Page Count: 4

PREVIEW

Note: This article is a review of another work, such as a book, film, musical composition, etc. The original work is not included in the purchase of this review.

Copyright 2016 Pluto Journal

 Book Review 2

Review: Islamic State: The Digital Caliphate by Abdul Bari Atwan

Reviewed Work: Islamic State: The Digital Caliphate by Abdul Bari Atwan
Reviewed by Warren Chin
ReOrient
Vol. 2, No. 1 (Autumn 2016), pp. 95-99
Published by: Pluto Journals
DOI: 10.13169/reorient.2.1.0095
Stable URL:http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.13169/reorient.2.1.0095
Page Count: 5

PREVIEW

Note: This article is a review of another work, such as a book, film, musical composition, etc. The original work is not included in the purchase of this review.

Copyright 2016 Pluto Journal

 Book Review 3

Review: Barbarous Antiquity: Reorienting the Past in the Poetry of Early Modern England by Miriam Jacobson

Reviewed Work: Barbarous Antiquity: Reorienting the Past in the Poetry of Early Modern England by Miriam Jacobson
Review by: Bernadette Andrea
ReOrient
Vol. 2, No. 1 (Autumn 2016), pp. 100-103
Published by: Pluto Journals
DOI: 10.13169/reorient.2.1.0100
Stable URL:http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.13169/reorient.2.1.0100
Page Count: 4

PREVIEW

Note: This article is a review of another work, such as a book, film, musical composition, etc. The original work is not included in the purchase of this review.

Copyright 2016 Pluto Journals

Book Review 4

Review: Experiences of Islamophobia: Living with Racism in the Neoliberal Era by James Carr

Reviewed Works: Experiences of Islamophobia: Living with Racism in the Neoliberal Era by James Carr
Review by: Ismail Patel
ReOrient
Vol. 2, No. 1 (Autumn 2016), pp. 104-107
Published by: Pluto Journals
DOI: 10.13169/reorient.2.1.0104
Stable URL:http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.13169/reorient.2.1.0104
Page Count: 4

PREVIEW

Note: This article is a review of another work, such as a book, film, musical composition, etc. The original work is not included in the purchase of this review.

Copyright 2016 Pluto Journal

Book Review 5

Review: Arendt and America by Richard H. King

Reviewed Work: Arendt and America by Richard H. King
Review by: Liesbeth Schoonheim
ReOrient
Vol. 2, No. 1 (Autumn 2016), pp. 108-112
Published by: Pluto Journals
DOI: 10.13169/reorient.2.1.0108
Stable URL:http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.13169/reorient.2.1.0108
Page Count: 5

PREVIEW

Note: This article is a review of another work, such as a book, film, musical composition, etc. The original work is not included in the purchase of this review.

Copyright 2016 Pluto Journal

Book Review 6

Review: Religious Difference in a Secular Age: A Minority Report by Saba Mahmood

Reviewed Work: Religious Difference in a Secular Age: A Minority Report by Saba Mahmood
Review by: Jean-Michel Landry
ReOrient
Vol. 2, No. 1 (Autumn 2016), pp. 113-116
Published by: Pluto Journals
DOI: 10.13169/reorient.2.1.0113
Stable URL:http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.13169/reorient.2.1.0113
Page Count: 4

PREVIEW

Note: This article is a review of another work, such as a book, film, musical composition, etc. The original work is not included in the purchase of this review.

Copyright 2016 Pluto Journal

Book Review 7

Review: Visual Occupations: Violence and Visibility in a Conflict Zone by Gil Z. Hochberg

Reviewed Work: Visual Occupations: Violence and Visibility in a Conflict Zone by Gil Z. Hochberg
Review by: Kiven Strohm
ReOrient
Vol. 2, No. 1 (Autumn 2016), pp. 117-120
Published by: Pluto Journals
DOI: 10.13169/reorient.2.1.0117
Stable URL:http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.13169/reorient.2.1.0117
Page Count: 4

PREVIEW

Note: This article is a review of another work, such as a book, film, musical composition, etc. The original work is not included in the purchase of this review.

Copyright 2016 Pluto Journal

Subscriptions

ReOrient
Vol. 2, No. 1 (Autumn 2016), p. 121
Published by: Pluto Journals
DOI: 10.13169/reorient.2.1.0121
Stable URL:http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.13169/reorient.2.1.0121
Page Count: 1

PREVIEW NOT AVAILABLE

Note: This article is a review of another work, such as a book, film, musical composition, etc. The original work is not included in the purchase of this review.
Copyright 2016 Pluto Journals

Journal Info

ReOrient
Description: ReOrient is dedicated to rethinking those entities and events considered to lie outside the conceptuality of Western hegemony, culturally, geopolitically and philosophically. The journal encourages a decolonial and non-orientalist approach to the analysis of the historical and contemporary political, socio-economic, and cultural processes constitutive of the Islamicate in its widest-ranging permutations. It welcomes original submissions from the humanities and social sciences that engage with the development of critical Muslim studies and related topics. Contents will typically include contributions from the fields and related subfields of Political Science, Cultural Studies, History, Critical Theory, International Relations, Sociology, Art and Literature, Anthropology and Islamic Studies.

Coverage: 2015-2016 (Vol. 1, No. 1 – Vol. 2, No. 1)

Moving Wall: 3 years (What is the moving wall?)
ISSN: 20555601
EISSN: 2055561X
Subjects: Middle East Studies, Area Studies
Collections: Pluto Journals Package, Area Studies Discipline Package, Arts & Sciences XIV Collection
plutojournals

ReOrient is distributed via JSTOR: For more information about subscriptions and individual articles please go to ReOrient at JSTOR